Plenary Sessions

Plenary Session 1

 

​Keynote 1 - Physical Activity and Exercise as Medicine in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Translational Research Strategy

        

Summary:

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a debilitating long term condition affecting some 8% of the global population. Declining renal function is associated with extremely high cardiovascular risk, muscle wasting and high symptom burden including extreme fatigue. This leads to undesirably low levels of physical activity and reduced functional capacity which impacts on clinical outcome, quality of life and health and social care costs. Lifestyle management, including appropriate physical activity and exercise, has the potential to improve the health and wellbeing of people suffering with CKD but is rarely used as part of clinical care. This presentation will summarise the evidence relating to poor physical function and low physical activity levels in CKD, and describe the Leicester Kidney Lifestyle Team’s translational research strategy which aims to address these issues.
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​Keynote 2 - Exercise and Bone Health: is it all it’s cracked up to be?

        

Summary:

Ageing results in a loss of bone mass and strength, which predisposes an individual to osteoporosis and fragility fracture. Osteoporosis is a significant disorder that is reported to affect 22 million women and 5.5 million men in the EU (Hernlund et al., 2013). There were 3.5 million osteoporotoic fractures, 620 000 hip fractures, 520 000 vertebral fractures, 560 000 forearm fractures and 1 800 000 other fractures reported in the EU in 2010 (Hernlund et al., 2013). Whilst pharmacological therapies are available to combat osteoporosis, these are accompanied by concerns over their cost, long-term efficacy and side-effects, leading some to consider alternative options. Exercise has long been touted as a potential treatment for osteoporosis, but there is a lack of specificity in this message and some exercise interventions can only induce small effects on the bone that are not comparable with age-associated and site-specific bone losses. As such, there is a need to be more specific with the ‘types’ of exercise being prescribed and when. There is a greater need to understand how different exercise modalities and intensities could improve exercise efficacy and there could be some lessons to be learned here from the sporting world. This talk will cover arguments for and against exercise to promote bone strength and will finish with future recommendations on how to develop future research in this area for a more efficacious outcome.
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Plenary Session 2

​Keynote 3 - Physiological adaptations to traditional and novel exercise interventions as a function of age

        

Summary:

With global shifts in life expectancy, an obesity epidemic, and sedentary behaviour rapidly overtaking physical activity, “exercise for health” has never been a timelier topic. However, that these latter two changes have taken place on the background of a wealth of literature about the physiological and clinical benefits of exercise, suggests a need for tailored and or/ novel exercise interventions for different populations. Focussed on the interaction of age x physical activity, and the prevalence of non-communicable diseases with advancing age, this talk will first outline the physiological adaptations to resistance exercise training as a function of age, before introducing and exploring the efficacy of ‘novel’ exercise interventions across the lifespan. These novel interventions will include reduced-volume high-intensity interval training (HIIT), and the ‘static’ training modalities of remote ischaemic pre-conditioning and isometric handgrip training. The concept of responder status to exercise training will also be explored in the context of data from healthy volunteers and clinical (cancer) cohorts.
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​Keynote 4 - Exercise as metabolic medicine


Summary:

 

Exercise is recognised as an essential component of a 'healthy lifestyle'. The secular rise in metabolic disease (especially type 2 diabetes) has led to substantial interest in exercise as 'preventative medicine' for metabolic disease. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise on metabolic profile, metabolic flexibility and tissue health are generally still poorly understood. Furthermore, there is evidence that variability in response to exercise exists and this extends to the metabolic benefits of exercise. This talk will review type 2 diabetes as a paradigm of metabolic disease. We will then explore the idea of using exercise as a 'precision' medicine in metabolic disease guided by an individual’s biological background and stage of disease. Finally, recent work demonstrating a 'responder' transcriptome profile for exercise in metabolic disease will be presented.
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Plenary Session 3

​Keynote 5 - Exploring the Creative Behaviour Routes in Sports: the Role of Enrichment Environments

        

Summary:

Sports has been recognised as a suitable environment to ignite creativity. Developing this higher-order skill has become a hot topic of research in sports sciences. Over the years, the concept of creativity has evolved from the unidimensional to a multidimensional perspective and from factors related to personal characteristics to those concerning the role of the environment. This conceptual advance was well received in the sports field and a few holistic and multidimensional approaches have emerged, such as the Creativity Developmental Framework, intended to empower the youth’s creative behaviour. Accordingly, there is a greater need to understand how best to educate teachers and coaches for the successful enactment of creativity-friendly environments. This talk will cover the developmental trends of creativity in sports, present the Skills4genius program, and highlight the role of Physical Education to trigger a predisposition towards creativity.
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​Keynote 6 - Legitimizing Physical Education as a Source of Joy

        

Summary:

This keynote presents a specific perspective to viewing practice and research in physical education, introducing how school physical education curricula (and in turn physical education teacher education) can be legitimized in ways other than solely reliant on a health or physical activity discourse. Evidence will be provided from the work of the Physical Education, Physical Activity and Youth Sport (PEPAYS) Ireland Research Centre as well as the current physical education discourse, practice, policy and research in the Republic of Ireland.
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Plenary Session 4

​Keynote 7 - Filling the Gap or How do we Effectively Build and Translate Advanced Analytics to Professional Football Coaches. A F.C. Barcelona Story

        

Summary:

The brief history of data in football can be summarized in four different eras: a long winter of nothing, the birth of box-score statistics, the era of individualized (and non-contextualized) data, and the rise of high-frequency tracking data. The applied usage of data-driven analysis in football has suffered a delayed birth, in comparison with other sports such as Baseball and Basketball that account for near 20 years of experience in data analysis. However, the recent adoption of data analysis in football has missed a critical point: how do we communicate findings efficiently?, or even: what questions are relevant?, do we have the right data for answering them?. In this talk we will discuss about the journey we started at F.C. Barcelona which is centered in finding answers to the following question: can we use data to get insightful information than can be transmitted to coaches effectively?, covering from our current usage of tracking data to practical examples of how these analyses have helped our coaches.
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​Keynote 8 - Who, what, when and where? A comprehensive approach to multidimensional performance analysis in football

        

Summary:

Performance analysis in team sports, and particularly in football, has consistently divided its focus on three main parameters: Physical Performance; Technical Performance; and Tactical Performance. Following their own characteristics, each parameter is normally approached with a particular set of tools and instruments, leading to specific methods and performance indicators, potentially disconnecting their analysis and interpretation from the overall teams and players’ performance. Still, considering that during football performance every players’ actions influence and is influenced by the specific context of play, we can assume a possible co-dependence of the different performance parameters. With the increase of high-frequency data collection systems used during football practice, detailed information about each individual action is now available, as well as the particular context where it was performed. There is the need to consolidate all the gathered data into multidimensional performance indicators, increasing the contextual validity of the information. In this presentation we will share some conceptual viewpoints for this approach, present some methodological possibilities and explore existing results using multidimensional indicators.
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Plenary Session 5

​Keynote 9 - Dealing with congested fixtures in football

        

Summary:

During congested fixtures, athletes might have limited time for recovery. In elite sports, the time devoted to performance enhancement during congested match calendars might be short, so that the priorities should be driven to putting the athletes available for the upcoming fixtures. During these congested periods, several performance indicators might be affected. Similarly, these periods might influence the burden of injuries. Therefore, practitioners involved with elite sports should consider benchmark strategies to deal with congested competitive periods.
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​Keynote 10 - Football and Nutrition: Building a Team

        

Summary:

Out of all the factors which contribute to football performance, nutrition remains one of the only factors a that the player can directly influence and control. This session will discuss the scientific rationale which underpins nutrition recommendations for Football. Experiences from working with elite clubs such as FC Barcelona and Manchester City FC will be shared. The transition between practice and research will be discussed and how observations from the field inspired lab based scientific studies. Finally, practical advice for training and matches will be offered and direction for future research offered. IR is an employee of the Gatorade Sports Science Institute, a division of PepsiCo, Inc. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of PepsiCo Inc.
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